A set of papers used to escape France to the UK

Hi everyone,

Here is a lovely set of papers belonging to a Polish soldier who was lucky to escape to France, most likely via Romania in 1939.
He found refuge in London in 1944, only to be "repatriated" back home in 1947.
Added sample images, more can be read & seen via this link here bellow:

Amazing set of papers used to escape France - Our Passports

Neil


Click to enlarge the picture


 


 


 

Gerat Horch Kubel BMW Opel Wanderer Krupp Mercedes Bussing-Nag WH



EUR 5,00 (0 Bids)
End Date: 05. Sep. 21:18
Bid now | Add to watch list

More…

Guide to British Empire .303 Bandoliers

BANDOLIERS, COTTON, 50 ROUNDS, MARK II.

Entering service in 1906, Small Arms Ammunition (SAA) Bandoliers were issued throughout the Great War whenever additional ammunition was required. They carried two chargers with five rounds in each of the five pockets, were constructed of a thin jean material and were meant to be disposable. Given their lightweight design, they were often carried on patrol in place of a full set of webbing. Many soldiers also cut the shoulder strap in half so they could tie the ends together and wear the bandolier as a belt.

In addition to BREN magazines, the basic pouches of the Pattern 1937 Web Equipment were designed to hold a couple 50 round bandoliers, which could be accessed quickly in combat situations. Below are six examples of the Mk II Bandolier made in different parts of the Empire.

GREAT BRITAIN - 1916
The earliest Mk II Bandoliers were closed by means of Carr-type snaps or buttons. By mid 1916, copper hooks replaced both.

879160

This particular example features black-painted buttons which read “MODE DE PARIS” (or ‘Paris Fashion’ in English).

879161

This example was made by S. B. in February 1916 and features a Roman numeral ‘II’.

879162

GREAT BRITAIN - 1940
This British-made bandolier features the hooks introduced in 1916. The hooks are made of doubled copper wire which are simply pushed through a hole in the material and bent over.

879163

A close-up of the copper wire closure hook.

879164

This example was made by William S. Toms, Limited of High Wycombe and Exeter in April 1940 and features a Roman numeral ‘II’.

879165

DOMINION OF CANADA
Early Canadian bandoliers retained ammunition through the use of folded pockets, rather than hook closures. They were also made of a thin type of canvas instead of twilled jean material. By the end of the Second World War, Canada had adopted a design similar to British style.

879166

A close-up of the distinctive folded pockets used on Canadian bandoliers throughout the Great War and into the Second World War.

879167

This example was made by The American Pad And Textile Company (TAPATCO) of Chatham, Ontario in 1940.

879168

A close-up of a Canadian load stamp

A) Number of rounds
B) Small Arms
C) General purpose ‘Ball’ rounds (rather than tracer, armour-piercing, incendiary, dummy, etc.)
D) .303 Inch Calibre
E) Boxes for the load date
F) Mark VII Cartridges
G) Canadian government ownership mark (a broad arrow inside the letter ‘C’)
H) Ammunition Factory Stamp – Possibly Defence Industries, Limited or Canadian Industries, Limited of Quebec
I) Symbol for “cartridge, small arm, ball” (a rectangle with a line through it)

879169

UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA
South African Mk II bandoliers have a unique construction which include a cloth trim and partially covered sheet copper closure hooks. Although this Mk II bandolier was made in South Africa, the illegible markings make the date of manufacture unclear.

879170

A close-up of the distinctive South African closure hook, with its base covered in cloth.

879187

This example was made by Leibowitz Brothers (Party), Limited of Johannesburg and features a Roman numeral ‘II’ as well as an illegible date stamp.

879171

GOVERNMENT OF INDIA
Indian-made bandoliers were very close to the original British pattern and were heavily used in Burma, where jungle fighting necessitated lightweight kit.

879172

Like British-made bandoliers, this Indian bandolier utilizes hooks made of doubled copper wire which are simply pushed through a hole in the material and bent over.

879173

A close-up of an Indian Government clothing factory inspection stamp found on most Indian-made garments. These marks usually consist of a circle with inspection codes above and below a date (in this case, November 1943) flanking a broad arrow.

879174

COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA
Australia produced and exported a great deal of ammunition during the Second World War and many surviving British and Australian bandoliers feature purple Australian reload stamps.

879175

The closure hooks on Australian-made bandoliers are often stamped from sheet copper, rather than made of folded copper wire.

879177

This example was made by Melbourne Textiles of Melbourne, Victoria in 1942.

879178

A close-up of an Australian load stamp

A) Number of rounds
B) General purpose ‘Ball’ rounds (rather than tracer, armour-piercing, incendiary, dummy, etc.)
C) .303 Inch Calibre
D) Mark VII Cartridge
E) Load date – April 13, 1944
F) Small Arms Ammunition Factory Number 6 – Welshpool, Australia
G) Symbol for “cartridge, small arm, ball” (a rectangle with a line through it)

879179


Click to enlarge the picture


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

Trench art shell casing

I bought this last year and finally got around to taking some pics. If anyone can tell me more about it I would be grateful. Height 57cm/22.5 inches and open end 155mm/6". Base says it was made by Patronenfabrik in Karlsruhe in I assume 1900. It sits behind the cats little box, so has collected a little dust in the engraving, but apart from dusting it I am loth to spoil the patina by scrubbing it.
879156879157879158879159


Click to enlarge the picture


 


 


 


 

M40 Heer Helmet for review

Hello gentlemen a long times since i have posted anything except for signed photos.
Would just like to pass this one by people, it is a m40 Heer Helmet in rather good external condition. It looks as if there may have been a national shield at one point. My only issue is that the liner possibly looks to small for this helmet ? Also EF64 a large or small size?
Thanks Morris, Pictures below

879136879137879138879139879140879141879142879143879144879145879146879147879148


Click to enlarge the picture


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

Offered this sd m-40, what say ye?

Thanks loads mates.


Click to enlarge the picture


 


 


 


 


 

Thinking of a trip to Caen to visit the battlefields any advice

Hi guys been looking at going to Caen for a while now, might make the trip this year or many early spring next year.

Was planing on going to Caen and the beaches and Falaise pocket, the German war graves.
and any museums close by.

Any advice how to plan the trip and pick where to go. was thinking of staying a week and will be in a car also.
As im sure alot of you guys have made the trip.

Thanks in advance Martin

Stahlhelm 2 Weltkrieg,Tarnanstrich,Belgien



EUR 30,00 (0 Bids)
End Date: 06. Sep. 20:20
Bid now | Add to watch list

Click to view the auction article

Gerat Deckel ORIG WH STALINGRAD



EUR 3,00 (0 Bids)
End Date: 05. Sep. 21:18
Bid now | Add to watch list

More…

« Previous entries